Books by Fiona Joseph

Fiona Joseph has written two books set in Birmingham featuring the fascinating Cadbury family who did so much for working people in this city. Her book Beatrice: the Cadbury heiress who gave away her fortune is a biography of one member of that family. Lyzzybee reviews it here and says –

“We are taken all the way through Beatrice’s long life, from a privileged upbringing as one of the Cadbury family of South Birmingham (although, true to their philanthropic and Quaker roots, she was exposed to poverty, its causes and its alleviation early on), through a dawning political and social consciousness, to her marriage and espousal of more and more outlandish concepts, including attempting to give her “unearned” inheritance back to the Cadbury workers and even giving up money, for a while. In a pertinent echo of the Occupy and other social movements happening now, but in an era when such actions, especially by the upper or more wealthy classes were seen as hugely unusual, she and her husband, Kees Boeke, protested against two World Wars, were arrested and imprisoned, refused to pay their taxes, kept open house, ran a school on new educational principles, were nearly executed for helping Jewish refugees, and all the while, Beatrice was popping out child after child: eight in all.”

 

Fiona’s second book is a novel set among the women working in the Cadbury factory during World War One. Of Comforts for the Troops Heaven-Ali says:

“Comforts for the Troops, is a novel set in Birmingham during World War 1 – among the women who worked in the Cadbury factory. Often the butt of jokes, Birmingham is in fact a fascinating city with an enthralling history – Fiona Joseph has really tapped into that history and brought it to life. If you have ever been to Cadbury World you will know the history of the factory and that the Bournville village created for the factory workers was a ground-breaking, life changing project in its time. I feel sure that the walls must be permeated with the stories of the men and women who worked there. Fiona Joseph has given us some of those stories with her novel.”(Full review)